Condor Kit Car ID’d

Joe Lee confirmed for me that one of my earlier mystery cars was in fact a “Condor” kit car and that McLellan’s has some early sales materials up for purchase — anyone want to buy it and donate some scans of the materials? They confirm that the car was set up for a mid-engine V8. It actually looks alright in that finished yellow example…

8 Responses

  1. Troy Harrison says:

    Thanks for posting that. That is exactly the literature package that I used to have, and means that my memory is still serviceable!

  2. Troy Harrison says:

    Thanks for posting that. That is exactly the literature package that I used to have, and means that my memory is still serviceable!

  3. I have a condor with a 396…for sale

  4. Gary Oakes says:

    I have the condor stinger vin 771001

  5. andrew says:

    I have just uncovered one of these, needs rebuilding but am totally lost for info or where to start, it has a 13b rotary, and needs a few things.
    would love to touch base with anyone who knows Anything about this car

  6. Dave Peto says:

    My brother and I were part of the small group who worked with Russ Keller (former Kelmark) to build the body molds and prototype Condor Stinger back in the mid-70s. The yellow one shown in the brochure was the only one we completed although Russ had made some extra bodies (4 or 5) that were sold. The body was not pulled from a real Lambo, it was made from molds pulled from a plywood and Bondo buck. Russ sketched up the design and figured out how to make the mock-up. The finish was probably the best feature on the car – it was smooth and straight. The 396 Chevy engine was out of my brother’s wrecked pickup truck and was mated to a Toronado transaxle via a 16 inch driveshaft enclosed in a housing. The drivetrain was pretty stout. I took one ride in it and it was impressive! It looked great from the rear quarters and back but the front end looked funny. This might’ve been due to the need to leave enough draft in the nose to allow it to pop free from the molds easier.

    The yellow prototype car was acquired by the fabricator who designed and built the chassis through a lien he placed against it for nonpayment. Shortly after that, he passed away and it went to his widow. Her new husband eventually got it and I’m not sure where it is now although the last time I saw it was in the late 1980s in Dayton, Ohio. All I have left are the 3 different brochures.

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